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September 2012 - Steven Joseph Photography

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Why’s It Take So Long To Get My Photos?

September 5, 2012 | By | One Comment

AFTER: this image was dramatically improved with some quick context-sensitive fill-in, cloning out my lovely wife and lighting assistant Christina, a little toning, crop and vignetting. Voila!

AFTER: we patched up the grass, cropped in a little tighter, bumped a tone curve on it. This is what a *finishedimage looks like. We spend a lot of time making your images look better.

BEFORE: This is what the image looked like straight out of the camera (pretty nice, right? 🙂 ) But the grass needs sprucing up, she could use a vignette, and the crop is a little wide.

STEVE, you promise to get our photos to us in 6-12 weeks. Why’s it take that long?

That’s a fair question. The quick answer is because we care. We care deeply about how great your photos look. And we want them to look the very best that they can. We’ve even had clients say they think we care more about making their photos great than they do.

For a full day wedding we’ll come home with 2,000 to 4,000 images. We touch every single one, if only to put some out of their misery 🙂  Most photos, however, we love dearly, and like a fussy mother we want our gorgeous children to look their best, their hair combed, their shirt tucked in, that chocolate milk shake mustache wiped off of their pretty face.

What exactly do we do that takes so long? Here’s an incomplete, short list of some of the things we do to just about every photo we touch.

  • culling (rate, reject, accept, star)
  • dust spot removal
  • crop / straighten
  • adjust color temperature / white balance
  • exposure / f/stop
  • fill light
  • black point
  • brightness
  • contrast
  • clarity / sharpen
  • vibrance
  • tone curve
  • noise reduction
  • vignette

Then for some photos we take it even further, giving extra special TLC in advanced editing apps like Photoshop. Often when I use off-camera lighting I need to remove my assistant & the light & light stand from the shot using Photoshop.

Please enjoy seeing the BEFORE & AFTER examples below. And thank you for your patience as we get our children cleaned up, looking their best before we send them out the door over to your house!   🙂

AFTER: Cloned out my lighting assistant, a smidge of toning & vignetting.AFTER: saturation, sharpening, toning, vignetting.

AFTER: cloning out my lighting assistant, selective toning on my beautiful happy couple.