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Denise & Scott at The (Verdant) Lake Club at Lake Las Vegas

January 11, 2012 | By | No Comments

Denise and Scott are one of my favorite couples ever. They celebrated their gorgeous wedding with lots of family and friends at the incomparably beautiful The Lake Club @ Lake Las Vegas.

The Lake Club is truly one of my favorite places to photograph a wedding, for so many reasons:

  • Lush, Green, Beautiful
  • Water water everywhere
  • Intimate, human-scale layout, easy to walk everywhere you need to go
  • First rate staff with tremendous experience and elán
  • Private, absolutely no tourists traipsing through your gorgeous wedding
  • Only 30 minutes from The Strip – yet secluded, exclusive, comfortable, quiet

Denise and Scott did a 2 hour pre-wedding shoot where all of the formals, bridals and bride and groom shoots were done.  When couples choose this route, it eliminates  the stress associated with wanting to hurry to get back to your guests. This is the new trend with couples.  One might wonder if the thrill and excitement of “first sight” is gone but, not at all.  Denise and Scott were still filled with emotion  and excitement as she walked down the aisle. I highly recommend doing pre-wedding formals, for the very best portraits, and for dramatically less stress for everyone.

Venue: The Lake Club at Las Vegas with Sophia Bettelhein and Shawna Michelle Kellis

Ceremony: Pastor Pete with Elegant vegas weddings

DJ: Manny Ramos with Thirty Three Group

Hair: Tonia with Bombshell Beauty

Dress: Alfred Angelo

Makeup: Megan Payne with Make up in the 702

Tuxedos: Bow Ties Tuxedo

Invitations by Wedding Paper Divas

Flowers: Blossoms by Gayle

Centerpieces: Kelly Larsen (step mom)

Cake: Chef Flemming with The Lake Club

Second Photography: Adam Trujillo

Linens: The Lake Club

 

 

Judith & Kenneth at the elegant and colorful Wynn

January 4, 2012 | By | No Comments


This fusion wedding blended the western elegance of this stylish couple with colorful and distant Nigerian dress and customs. I do not know whether Judith and Kenneth descend from Nigerian royalty but they certainly carried themselves as if, with the grace, confidence and stature of princess and prince. The Wynn offers such an explosion of color and detail, it is a photographer’s dream. And, even though the bride was not allowed to let me photograph their brief ceremony (a privilege reserved by the ubiquitous and high-volume Cashman Brothers), I was with Judith and Kenneth from early in the morning ’til late at night. We even snuck in an “engagement” session the day after. How they dragged themselves from bed after such a great party I’ll never know. Thanks to Chris Purdum for his usual outstanding 2nd photography – it is always an honor and I feel tremendously fortunate to shoot with Chris.




Merry Christmas Everyone

December 24, 2011 | By | One Comment

Santa Chris is wrapping presents. Thanks to her we’re ready for the big guy. Thank you God for the ability to provide for our children.

Does the Quality of 2nd Photography Matter? Hell Yea!

December 23, 2011 | By | No Comments

Does the Quality of 2nd Photography Matter? The short answer is: Hell Yeah! but not for everyone.

Currently I offer my clients two levels of 2nd photography:

  • Artisan, and Associate. Artisan 2nd Photography costs my clients $200 an hour.
  • Associate 2nd Photography is free.

Why the big difference in price?

Artisan 2nd Photographers are full-time wedding photographers who happen to be available on the day of your wedding. They are my peers, my competitors, my friends. They are skilled craftsmen and artists whose work I admire greatly. They possess many hundreds or even thousands of hours of experience. They know exactly what needs doing at your wedding, and how to use their gear to get it done. They’re not figuring out f/stops and ISO and lighting. They’re not wondering how to pose the groomsmen or how to make your cake & reception hall look stellar. They mastered all that long ago. And their work is outstanding. Here are just a few examples of the gorgeous work from some of the 2nd photographers my couples & I have been fortunate enough to get on their wedding day.

Wedding Photography Las Vegas Springs Preserve Steven Fogarty FOGARTYFOTOWedding Photographers Las Vegas Loews Las Vegas Lake Las VegasWedding Photographers Las Vegas Wynn Steve Fogarty NigerianWedding Photographers Las Vegas Steve Fogarty FOGARTYFOTO

Associate 2nd Photographers work for free. They are willing to work for free for many reasons. They want the practice. They may already be accomplished in family portrait or another type of photography, or they may be just breaking in. They may need to master their gear and learn the ropes in one of the most demanding photography environments there is – weddings. They may need to develop a wedding portfolio for their own websites.

Regardless, while they may produce outstanding work as 2nd photographer for your wedding, I do not expect that, nor should my clients. Which is why they are free.

Associate 2nd photography coverage is a good option for couples who weren’t planning on having a 2nd but welcome the possibility of extra coverage with uncertain results.

And for those couples who expect the kind of outstanding wedding photography that only comes from years of experience, Artisan 2nd photography is worth the extra dollars.

I LOVE the Party!!!

December 12, 2011 | By | One Comment

I LOVE the Party. If the party is rockin’, I can’t leave before it’s over. The party is joy, it is ecstasy, it is acceptable animalism, it is naughty, it is vigorous, it is up close, sweaty, emotional, sensual, sexy, it is everything we’re not supposed to be the rest of the day, the rest of the night, the rest of our lives. I LOVE the party. More party please.

A good DJ makes a big difference. And this DJ – Mike Fox – got EVERYBODY at Kylie & Alex’s wedding up and dancing and laughing. He’s one of the best DJs I’ve ever worked with.



Shockingly, Photographers Can’t Work for Free.

December 12, 2011 | By | No Comments

Tony Wu has graciously allowed his article to be shared under a Creative Commons license. Here is a link to the original article. http://photoprofessionals.wordpress.com/

Reasons Why Professional Photographers Cannot Work for Free

Dear potential photo buyer,

If you have been directed to this page, it is likely that you have requested the use of an image or images for free or minimal compensation.

As professional photographers, we receive requests for free images on a regular basis. In a perfect world, each of us would love to be able to respond in a positive manner and assist, especially with projects or efforts related to areas such as education, social issues, and conservation of natural resources. It is fair to say that in many cases, we wish we had the time and resources to do more to assist than just send photographs.

Unfortunately, such are the practicalities of life that we are often unable to respond, or that when we do, our replies are brief and do not convey an adequate sense of the reasons underlying our response.

Circumstances vary for each situation, but we have found that there are a number of recurring themes, which we have set out below with the objective of communicating more clearly with you, and hopefully avoiding misunderstandings or unintentionally engendering ill will.

Please take the following points in the constructive manner in which they are intended. We certainly hope that after you have had a chance to read this, we will be able to talk again and establish a mutually beneficial working relationship.

Photographs Are Our Livelihood
Creating compelling images is the way we make our living. If we give away our images for free, or spend too much time responding to requests for free images, we cannot make a living.

We Do Support Worthy Causes With Images
Most of us do contribute photographs, sometimes more, to support certain causes. In many cases, we may have participated directly in projects that we support with images, or we may have a pre-existing personal relationship with key people involved with the efforts concerned. In other words, each of us can and does provide images without compensation on a selective basis.

We Have Time Constraints
Making a leap from such selective support to responding positively to every request we get for free photographs, however, is impractical, if for no other reason than the substantial amount of time required to respond to requests, exchange correspondence, prepare and send files, and then follow-up to find out how our images were used and what objectives, if any, were achieved. It takes a lot of time to respond to requests, and time is always in short supply.

Pleas of “We Have No Money” Are Often Difficult to Fathom
The primary rationale provided in nearly all requests for free photographs is budgetary constraint, meaning that the requestor pleads a lack of funds.

Such requests frequently originate from organisations with a lot of cash on hand, whether they be publicly listed companies, government or quasi-government agencies, or even NGOs. Often, it is a simple matter of taking a look at a public filing or other similar disclosure document to see that the entity concerned has access to significant funding, certainly more than enough to pay photographers a reasonable fee should they choose to do so.

To make matters worse, it is apparent that all too often, of all the parties involved in a project or particular effort, photographers are the only ones being asked to work for free. Everyone else gets paid.

Given considerations like this, you can perhaps understand why we frequently feel slighted when we are told that: “We have no money.” Such claims can come across as a cynical ploy intended to take advantage of gullible individuals.

We Have Real Budget Constraints
With some exceptions, photography is not a highly remunerative profession. We have chosen this path in large part due to the passion we have for visual communication, visual art, and the subject matters in which we specialise.

The substantial increase in photographs available via the internet in recent years, coupled with reduced budgets of many photo buyers, means that our already meager incomes have come under additional strain.

Moreover, being a professional photographer involves significant monetary investment.

Our profession is by nature equipment-intensive. We need to buy cameras, lenses, computers, software, storage devices, and more on a regular basis. Things break and need to be repaired. We need back-ups of all our data, as one ill-placed cup of coffee could literally erase years of work. For all of us, investment in essential hardware and software entails thousands of dollars a year, as we need to stay current with new technology and best practices.

In addition, travel is a big part of many of our businesses. We must spend a lot of money on transportation, lodging and other travel-related costs.

And of course, perhaps most importantly, there is a substantial sum associated with the time and experience we have invested to become proficient at what we do, as well as the personal risks we often take. Taking snapshots may only involve pressing the camera shutter release, but creating images requires skill, experience and judgement.

So the bottom line is that although we certainly understand and can sympathise with budget constraints, from a practical point of view, we simply cannot afford to subsidise everyone who asks.

Getting “Credit” Doesn’t Mean Much
Part and parcel with requests for free images premised on budgetary constraints is often the promise of providing “credit” and “exposure”, in the form or a watermark, link, or perhaps even a specific mention, as a form of compensation in lieu of commercial remuneration.

There are two major problems with this.

First, getting credit isn’t compensation. We did, after all, create the images concerned, so credit is automatic. It is not something that we hope a third party will be kind enough to grant us.

Second, credit doesn’t pay bills. As we hopefully made clear above, we work hard to make the money required to reinvest in our photographic equipment and to cover related business expenses. On top of that, we need to make enough to pay for basic necessities like food, housing, transportation, etc.

In short, receiving credit for an image we created is a given, not compensation, and credit is not a substitute for payment.

“You Are The Only Photographer Being Unreasonable”
When we do have time to engage in correspondence with people and entities who request free photos, the dialogue sometimes degenerates into an agitated statement directed toward us, asserting in essence that all other photographers the person or entity has contacted are more than delighted to provide photos for free, and that somehow, we are “the only photographer being unreasonable”.

We know that is not true.

We also know that no reasonable and competent photographer would agree to unreasonable conditions. We do allow for the fact that some inexperienced photographers or people who happen to own cameras may indeed agree to work for free, but as the folk wisdom goes: “You get what you pay for.”

Please Follow-Up
One other experience we have in common is that when we do provide photographs for free, we often do not receive updates, feedback or any other form of follow-up letting us know how the event or project unfolded, what goals (if any) were achieved, and what good (if any) our photos did.

All too often, we don’t even get responses to emails we send to follow-up, until, of course, the next time that someone wants free photographs.

In instances where we do agree to work for free, please have the courtesy to follow-up and let us know how things went. A little consideration will go a long way in making us feel more inclined to take time to provide additional images in the future.

Wrap Up
We hope that the above points help elucidate why the relevant photographer listed below has sent you to this link. All of us are dedicated professionals, and we would be happy to work with you to move forward in a mutually beneficial manner.
http://bit.ly/vvxIw8